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manthy21
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« on: July 18, 2011, 07:50:17 am »

Hi please can someone help me with this. Medication unit 4222-331

1) Explain where responsibilities lie in relation to the use of 'over the counter' remedies and supplements.
does the responsibility le with the person taking them.

2) Also Describe how ethical issues may arise over the use of medication can be addressed.

thanx for any help
« Last Edit: July 18, 2011, 08:19:09 am by manthy21 » Report Spam   Logged

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Aunty Sue
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« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2011, 09:58:37 am »

Hi manthy21,

1) From the CQC Professional advice - The administration of medicines in care homes:

Can care workers give medicines that the doctor has not prescribed?

41.    Many medicines can be purchased through wholesalers and retail outlets by anyone.  People may decide to buy and keep remedies to take themselves, including herbal remedies and products that they purchase from other countries.

42.    When the care provider keeps a range of ‘homely remedies’, it is care workers who will decide whether to give them to a resident or not.  Homely remedies are used to provide immediate relief for mild to moderate symptoms. They are treatments that people would use themselves without consulting their GP, for example to treat toothache or indigestion.  These medicines are potent and may interact with medicines that the doctor has prescribed for residents.  

43.    The care provider is under no obligation to provide this treatment.  But if homely remedies are purchased for occasional use by residents, the care provider must have a written policy that details the following:
•   which medicines are kept for immediate relief of mild symptoms that a resident may choose to self-treat in their own home
•   the indications for offering the medicines
•   the dose to give and how often it may be repeated before referring to the resident’s doctor
•   how to establish with the resident’s GP that the remedies will not interact with other prescribed medicines
•   how to obtain the resident’s consent to treatment that the doctor has not prescribed
•   how the administration will be recorded.

44.    If a problem such as constipation persists, residents should consult with their GP because the symptoms may be masking other medical problems.  This is why homely remedy use should be time-limited.

2) This could be where you have concerns about an individual with a terminal illness and you have been told to give doses of pain medication which you know could lead to their death. You have the right to refuse to do this if you believe that it is not ethical. You cannot be forced to comply but you cannot interfere if the individual has made this choice. Or it could be that you realise that the medication an individual contains something that is not allowed by the individual's religion or choices eg vegetarian. You should report this so that an alternative can
be prescribed.

Hope that helps

Aunty Sue
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manthy21
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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2011, 08:21:41 am »

Hi auntie sue thanx for your help. The cqc info u gave is that the same for care in the community. Thanx
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Aunty Sue
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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2011, 09:38:12 am »


Hi manthy21,

(CQC) General rules for adult service users

6.    Adults supported in their own homes by a domiciliary care agency will normally be responsible for their own medicines, both prescribed and non-prescribed. Some are able to fully administer their own medicines, others will require varying levels of support.  In some cases, the level of support for medication will be substantial.

8.   Care workers should not offer advice to a people about over-the-counter medication or complementary treatments. 

9.    The agency is responsible for agreeing the level of support required and ensuring that the appropriate record keeping and training needs are met. The person’s plan will require review as needs change.

Again you should have a policy for this.

Hope that helps

Aunty Sue
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